Српски ћирилица  Srpski latinica  English  Руский  Ελληνικά

CHURCH UTENSILS


 
From the earliest days the Church has employed utensils and vessels of metal in its liturgical ceremonies. This practice increased during the Middle Ages. The history of the metalwork of the Church in the Middle Ages is in fact the history of the art of metalworking in general, and this is not only because the Church was the foremost patron of such works and because almost all the works that have been preserved from the Middle Ages are ecclesiastical in character, but also because until the twelfth century the works of the goldsmith were also almost exclusively manufactured by monks and clerics. But in the period of the Renaissance also the manufacture of church metalwork formed a very important branch of the goldsmith's art, and even in our own day these works are counted among those in the production of which that art can be most profitably developed; but not only the goldsmith's art, that is the artistic treatment of the precious metal, had its growth and development in the service of the Church, the base metals also, especially iron, bronze, and brass, have been largely used. As we are dealing, however, with the historical development of the metalwork in the service of the Church, we shall confine ourselves more particularly to works in the precious metals, without however entirely excluding those in the inferior metals from our consideration.


Click on "ENLARGE" to get details and description of the item.

 

|CS001|

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE

 

ENLARGE
   
<  Chalices

^
Catalogue

Candle holders  >